How to increase evenly along a set number of rows

This is an older post, from like 2006. It's something I've found pretty useful. I was recently sharing my Knitting Maine book with the Metro West Knitters Guild in Needham, MA and this old post came up in conversation. So, here it is again. Fresh and new.

Somehow, this little magic formula found it's way into my brain. It works EVERY TIME for increasing or decreasing evenly along a certain number of rows.

The first thing you need to do is figure out your gauge! This won't work if you don't know your gauge.

So, for our little example, our gauge is 5 sts and 7 rows = 1 inch in whatever stitch you feel like imagining.

The first thing we're going to shape is a sleeve.
With a stitch gauge of 5 sts/inch, figure out how many stitches you will have at the beginning of the shaping.

To do this, multiply 7¾" x 5 sts = 38.75 sts. Of course, we can't have a fraction of a stitch, so based on your stitch pattern, you'll need to round either up or down. I'm going to round down, I'll tell you why in a second. So, there are 38 sts at the cuff of the sleeve.

Now, lets figure out how many stitch there will be at the underarm: 12" x 5 sts = 60. That worked out perfectly, no fractions, and it's an even number. That's why I chose 38 over 39 sts for the cuff. You want to keep the numbers the same, either odd or even.

Now you want to figure out the difference between the two numbers.
60 - 38 = 22.

This tells us that we need to increase a total of 22 stitches to get to 12" from 7¾". Because we will be working our increases on each end of the rows, lets divide this in half so there will be 11 increase rows, with 1 st increased on each end on each row.

But how many rows do we have to increase in? 
The whole length of the sleeve will be 17½" from the cast-on edge to the underarm. The first 2 inches will be worked without shaping, so we don't want to include those rows in our increasing. That leaves us to increase in 15½", which multiplied by the row gauge of 7 is 108.5 rows. Rounded to an even number is: 108 rows.

Now comes the fun part… how often do we work these increase rows? 

Step 1: Take the number of rows (108) and divide it by the number of times we will be working an increase row (11):

108 ÷ 11 = 9.818181"
If you get a number that is between 1 and 2, see below **

Step 2: Now, take the two even numbers closest to this number. In this case they are 8 and 10. I set them up like this to keep things consistent (See diagram A). These are the row spans that you will be using, such as increase every 8 rows so many times then every 10 rows so many times.

Now we're going to figure out how many times for each of them.

Step 3: Multiply the larger of these two numbers (in this case, the 10) by the amount of times we need to increase: 10 x 11 = 110

Step 4: From this number, subtract the total amount of rows you will be increasing in 110 - 108 = 2

Step 5: Then divide that number in half 2 ÷ 2 = 1. Place that number beside the smaller of your two numbers (See diagram B).

Step 6: Now take the total number of increase rows and subtract the number you're left with in Step 5: 11 - 1 = 10 and place this number beside the larger of your two numbers in your diagram (See diagram C)

Step 7: To double check all this to make sure everything is right: multiply the number on the left by the number on the right for both the smaller number and the larger number: 8 x 1 = 8 then 10 x 10 = 100 (See diagram D). Then add the two numbers 8 + 100 = 108 rows! Yay, the rows are right!

Now check the amount of increase rows: Add the two right-side numbers 1 + 10 = 11 times (See diagram E) That's right too! Amazing!

**If you get a number between 1 and 2 from Step 1 above, continue as follows:
Of course if you get a number that is between 1 and 2, then choosing the even numbers above and below that number won't work. 0 just isn't a number that works in knitting. In this case you'll need to use 1 and 2 rather than 2 even numbers.

You may run into this if you are increasing a lot of stitches in fewer rows.

I'm going to pick random numbers here: we've got 20 rows to increase 13 times.
So, 20 divided by 13 = 1.53846... So we'll be using 1 and 2 for our numbers

 
Step 1: Set up your diagram in the same was as above, with the smaller number (1) on the top, and the larger number (2) on the bottom (See diagram F).

Step 2: Subtract the increase times (13) from the number of total rows (20) = 7. Insert that number beside the larger number (See diagram G).

Step 3: Subtract the number from Step 2 (7) from the total number of increase times (13) = 6. Insert that number beside the smaller number (See diagram H).

Step 4: Double check everything as in Step 7 above (See diagrams I and J).
The formula is the same for figuring out how to decrease. Simply decrease instead of increase when you work the decrease rows. I hope this is helpful for you all.


Everything - Days Until Christmas Sale!

Knitting Maine
Today's sale consists of everything in my Ravelry Store!

It's all 50% off for TODAY ONLY.

This includes e-books such as Knitting Maine, and gifts—if you want to gift another Ravelry member a specific pattern.

If there were any patterns you missed over the last 24 days that you wished you could have bought on sale, now is your chance!

This sale is for today only, so don't miss out on this great deal.

Have a very Merry Christmas, everyone, and a Happy New Year! May 2014 be the best one yet!

Little Crochet Hearts - Days Until Christmas Sale

Today I'm offering another FREE pattern. These little crochet hearts are SUPER-DUPER fast to make. I like to stuff them with calming herbs, such as lavender, sage and rose petals, but you can stuff them with whatever you like!


Free
Tomorrow you guys are in for a treat! Stay tuned, and happy knitting!



Mug Cozy - Days Until Christmas Sale

Today's FREE pattern is this Mug Cozy.

The sample shown is for a Valentine's Day mug cozy, but if you knit it with a Christmas tree instead of a heart, it can be for Christmas! Christmas Tree charts are shown below.


Free

Finished Measurements:
10" wide x 4" tall

Yarn Requirements:
Renaissance by Classic Elite
100% wool
50 gram hank = approx 110 yards
• 1 hank 7155 Renaissance Red
• 1 hank 7119 Rose

Knitting Needles
• One pair size US 8 (5 mm)
Or size to obtain gauge.
• cable needle

Gauge: 
19 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette Stitch. Take time to save time, check your gauge.

Rasa Beret - Days Until Christmas Sale

Today's sale pattern is the Rasa Beret!

A quick-to-knit beret, with a lace pattern to match the Homa sweater. Rasa is knit in the round from the brim to the crown. Pattern includes written and charted instructions for the lace patterns.


$4.00 (original price)
$2.00 (sale price - TODAY ONLY)

Finished Measurements:
16 (20, 24)" (40.5 [51, 61] cm) head circumference

Yarn Requirements:
Shown in Berroco's Remix yarn
30% nylon, 27% cotton, 24% acrylic, 10% silk, 9% linen (100% recycled)
100 gram ball = approx 216 yards
1 (1, 1) ball in color #3922 Buttercup, or approx 100 (125, 150) yards in a comparable earth-friendly yarn.

Knitting Needles:
Size US 6 and 7 (4 and 4.5 mm): double pointed needles.
Or size to obtain gauge.

Gauge: 
 16 sts and 32 rows = 4" in circular garter stitch. Take time to save time, check your gauge.



Violet Hat - Days Until Christmas Sale

Today's crochet sale pattern is the Violet Hat!

I love this stitch pattern—so much so that I crocheted 2 versions of this hat. While working on the second one, I took careful notes about what I did so I could post the pattern for you all to make your own versions! I swear, I haven't taken this hat off since I've made it. One version or the other is always on my head. When I was out shoveling snow yesterday I had the solid version on, then when I came in to get warm, I put the wet, snow covered hat asside to dry and the lacy version took its place on my head.

They're so comfortable and easy to make.


$4.00 (original price)
$2.00 (sale price - TODAY ONLY)



Sizes: Adult Small (Medium, Large)

Finished Measurements:
20 (22½, 25)" circumference

Yarn Requirements:
Ecological Wool by Cascade
100% natural peruvian wool
250 gram hank = approx 478 yards
• 1 hanks

Crochet Hook:
• One size US J/10 (6 mm)
Or size to obtain gauge.

Gauge: 
11 single crochets through the back loop = 4". Take time to save time, check your gauge.

Cabled Hat - Days Until Christmas Sale

Today's sale pattern is the Cabled Hat.

This hat is so fun and quick to knit. I knit mine in 2 evenings, then even in the 90 degree F heat I didn't want to take it off. It's as fun to wear as it was to make. The thick yarn makes it a very quick knit, and the pattern is interesting enough to hold my attention for the duration of the knitting.

A few stitches are cast on for the center top of the hat. The stitches are worked on double pointed needles and increases are worked for the crown. Once the increases are finished, the cable ribs are worked with the circular needle. One earflap is worked, then the other. I-cords are made and attached to the front and back of the hat, then they are braided.


$4.00 (original price)
$2.00 (sale price - TODAY ONLY)



Finished measurements:
20" circumference


Yarn Requirements:
Duchess by Classic Elite
40% merino, 28% viscose, 15% nylon, 10% cashmere, 7% angora
50 gram ball = approx 75 yards
• 2 balls 1058 Royal Red

Knitting Needles:
• one 16" circular size US 11 (8 mm)
Or size to obtain gauge.
• one set double pointed needles each size US 10 and 11 (6 and 8 mm)
• stitch marker
• cable needle

Gauge: 
 16 sts and 19 rows = 4" in Cable Rib, slightly stretched, using larger needles. Take time to save time, check your gauge.